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Long Cane Church

old wooden church that is white with black shutters

Long Cane Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church, 1771

Long Cane Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church, 1771

 

Long Cane's origins date to 1771, when the church was established as an Associate Presbyterian congregation, one of several fostered before the American Revolution by Dr. Thomas Clark (d. 1792). Clark and one hundred families had emigrated from Ireland in 1764, and had settled in Stillwater, and then Salem, New York; several families soon moved south, settling near Long Cane Creek, near what was then called "the Calhoun settlement" in the South Carolina backcountry. Dr. Clark himself moved to South Carolina in 1782 and served as minister of the Long Cane, Cedar Creek (later Cedar Springs), and Little Run (or Little River) congregations until he returned to the North in mid-1783, but returned to the Long Cane and Cedar Creek settlement shortly after the American Revolution, remaining here until his death.[4]

The original congregation at Long Cane was called "the Fort Boone congregation" because church, school, and physical security was provided in the fortifications (built after the Indian massacre of 1760) of Fort Boone. The original congregation at Long Cane united with the Cedar Springs Church on March 7, 1786 and withdrew on September 15, 1808. A later part of the congregation moved to the Presbyterian Church during 1818-1819, but reunited with the Cedar Springs Church from 1828 to 1892.

 

Long Cane Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church is a historic Associate Reformed Presbyterian church in McCormick County, South Carolina four miles west of Troy, South Carolina on SC 33-36.[2] Adjacent to the church building is a cemetery dating to circa 1790.

The church was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1999.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_Cane_Associate_Reformed_Presbyterian_Church#cite_note-scdah-2

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